dendroica
dendroica:

Breathtaking Microscope Photos of Moth & Butterfly Wings

The thing about nature is that, if you look close enough at just about anything, you’re bound to find a beauty and symmetry that defies description. In the case of Linden Gledhill‘s microscope photos of butterfly wings, he simply discovered another level of beauty in something that already captures many of our imaginations. A rainbow of colors and myriad textures greet you in Gledhill’s Butterfly wings Flickr set — each photograph more ethereal and alien than the last.

(via  PetaPixel)

dendroica:

Breathtaking Microscope Photos of Moth & Butterfly Wings

The thing about nature is that, if you look close enough at just about anything, you’re bound to find a beauty and symmetry that defies description. In the case of Linden Gledhill‘s microscope photos of butterfly wings, he simply discovered another level of beauty in something that already captures many of our imaginations. A rainbow of colors and myriad textures greet you in Gledhill’s Butterfly wings Flickr set — each photograph more ethereal and alien than the last.

(via PetaPixel)

astronomy-to-zoology
astronomy-to-zoology:

Brentus anchorago
…is a species of Straight-snouted weevil (Brentidae) that is widespread in the neotropics, including Mexico, the West Indies, South America, and southernmost Florida. Like other weevils B. anchorago feeds mainly on plant matter and is commonly associated with gumbo-limbo Bursera simaruba. B. anchorago will bore into dead wood and adults flourish under the bark of dead logs.
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Coleoptera-Polyphaga-Curculionoidea-Brentidae-Brentinae-Brentus-B. anchorago
Image: ©Michael C. Thomas

astronomy-to-zoology:

Brentus anchorago

…is a species of Straight-snouted weevil (Brentidae) that is widespread in the neotropics, including Mexico, the West Indies, South America, and southernmost Florida. Like other weevils B. anchorago feeds mainly on plant matter and is commonly associated with gumbo-limbo Bursera simaruba. B. anchorago will bore into dead wood and adults flourish under the bark of dead logs.

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Coleoptera-Polyphaga-Curculionoidea-Brentidae-Brentinae-Brentus-B. anchorago

Image: ©Michael C. Thomas

mucholderthen

mucholderthen:

Why Are Sloths Slow? And Other Sloth Facts
Reprinted in condensed form from WWF.

1. Why are sloths slow?
Sloths have an extremely low metabolic rate, which means they move at a languid, sluggish pace through the trees. …

2. Are female sloths good mothers?
Female sloths give birth to one baby a year after a gestation period of six months …

3. How often do sloths sleep?
Sloths snooze for about 15 hours per day. That leaves only nine hours to lumber through the trees. They maintain a low body temperature of about 30-34 degrees Celsius (86-93 degrees Fahrenheit) and move in and out of shade to regulate their body temperature.

4. What do sloths eat?
Sloths munch on leaves, twigs and buds. …

5. What threats do sloths face?
Though not all sloths are endangered, some of the six species are threatened by habitat loss. Deforestation in the tropical forests of South and Central America jeopardize the trees sloths rely on for food and shelter. …

6. Do sloths know how to swim?
Surprisingly, sloths are strong swimmers. …

7. Do sloths ever leave the trees?
Sloths spend a majority of their time up in the canopy, coming down only one time per week to relieve themselves. …

Check out the World Wildlife Org sloth page

wapiti3

wapiti3:

The British miscellany, or, Coloured figures of new, rare, or little known animal subjects : many not before ascertained to be inhabitants of the British Isles : and chiefly in the possession of the author, James Sowerby. on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Publication info
London :Printed by R. Taylor & Co., and sold by the author, J. Sowerby by White, Johnson, Symonds, 1806.
BHL Collections:
Smithsonian Libraries

yan-ton
libutron:

Cushion Sea Star | ©MacChristiansen
A bunch of Cushion Sea Star (also named Carpet Sea Star or Eight-armed Sea Star) from New South Wales, Australia.
These sea stars belong to Patiriella calcar species (Echinodermata - Asteroidea - Valvatida - Asterinidae), a moderately large seastar with clear-cut, short, tapering, pointed arms.
Patiriella calcar normally has eight arms, but sometimes 7 and 9 armed individuals are found. The color on top is extremely varied and often beautiful.

libutron:

Cushion Sea Star | ©MacChristiansen

A bunch of Cushion Sea Star (also named Carpet Sea Star or Eight-armed Sea Star) from New South Wales, Australia.

These sea stars belong to Patiriella calcar species (Echinodermata - Asteroidea - Valvatida - Asterinidae), a moderately large seastar with clear-cut, short, tapering, pointed arms.

Patiriella calcar normally has eight arms, but sometimes 7 and 9 armed individuals are found. The color on top is extremely varied and often beautiful.